Can You Get Braces With Periodontal Disease

If you have gum disease, you may wonder if you can still get braces. It depends on how much bone loss you have and how advanced the problem is.

Gum disease (gum infection) is a common oral health problem that can affect patients of all ages. The first stage of the disease, called gingivitis, makes gums look red and swollen.

can you get braces with periodontal disease

Gum Disease

If you have gum disease, you may be wondering if it can affect your ability to get braces. It depends on the extent of your gum disease, how advanced it is and what treatments you’ve had in the past.

Gum disease is caused by a build-up of plaque (a sticky substance that contains bacteria). People with gum disease often have swollen, red and tender gums that bleed when brushing or flossing.

In its early stages, gingivitis is easy to treat with better oral hygiene habits. Your dentist can show you how to brush and floss more effectively, suggest mouth rinses if necessary, and remove any hardened plaque.

If you don’t get gum disease treated, it can move into a more serious stage called periodontitis. This starts by affecting more tissues that hold teeth in place, and it can eventually destroy bone and ligaments around the tooth.

Bleeding Gums

Bleeding gums are one of the main signs that you have periodontal disease. This disease is a chronic infection of the gums and bone surrounding your teeth.

It can erode the tissue, ligaments and bone that support your teeth. It can also cause a cycle of bleeding, pain, bad breath and tooth loss if left untreated.

A person can prevent and control bleeding gums by practicing good oral hygiene habits, eating healthy foods and seeing a doctor for regular checkups. They can also help their gums bleed less by reducing their stress level.

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Brush your teeth twice a day with a soft-bristled toothbrush and floss regularly to remove plaque from your mouth. Avoid hard or sticky food items that can damage your braces or irritate your gums, such as corn on the cob, steak and popcorn.

Loss of Bone and Ligaments

Can You Get Braces With Periodontal Disease

Your teeth are held in place by bone and ligaments that attach to the cementum (thin layer of tissue) covering the root, and to the alveolar bone that surrounds your jaw. Damage to these parts of your tooth can lead to a loose or missing tooth.

The pressure of biting and chewing stimulates your jawbone to grow new bone, but if you lose one or more teeth without replacing them, the stimulation is gone and your jawbone gradually deteriorates.

Certain conditions increase your chances of losing bone, including osteoporosis and Paget’s disease of bone (PDB). Tumors can also cause jawbone deterioration.

Periodontitis, a more severe form of gum disease, eats away at the bone and ligaments that hold your teeth in place. Eventually, this causes your jaw to deteriorate and your teeth may fall out or need to be extracted.

Tooth Decay

Can You Get Braces With Periodontal Disease

Tooth decay is caused by bacteria that feed on sugars and starches in food and drink, forming acids that attack the hard outer layer of teeth called enamel. These acids eat away at the tooth over time, damaging its layers, and eventually causing a hole (cavity) in the tooth.

Early stage tooth decay may not cause any symptoms at all, but your dentist will be able to spot it during an examination or x-ray. They can treat it by applying fluoride treatments like mouthwash or varnish, which will reverse the damage and strengthen your teeth.

As tooth decay progresses, it can lead to pain and infection in the center of your tooth (the pulp). This is where blood and nerves are found. If the decay gets to this part of the tooth, your dentist will need to remove it in a procedure known as root canal treatment. This will also sometimes result in the need to extract your tooth.

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If you have gum disease, you may wonder if you can still get braces. It depends on how much bone loss you have and how advanced the problem is.

Gum disease (gum infection) is a common oral health problem that can affect patients of all ages. The first stage of the disease, called gingivitis, makes gums look red and swollen.

Gum Disease

If you have gum disease, you may be wondering if it can affect your ability to get braces. It depends on the extent of your gum disease, how advanced it is and what treatments you’ve had in the past.

Gum disease is caused by a build-up of plaque (a sticky substance that contains bacteria). People with gum disease often have swollen, red and tender gums that bleed when brushing or flossing.

In its early stages, gingivitis is easy to treat with better oral hygiene habits. Your dentist can show you how to brush and floss more effectively, suggest mouth rinses if necessary, and remove any hardened plaque.

If you don’t get gum disease treated, it can move into a more serious stage called periodontitis. This starts by affecting more tissues that hold teeth in place, and it can eventually destroy bone and ligaments around the tooth.

Bleeding Gums

Can You Get Braces With Periodontal Disease

Bleeding gums are one of the main signs that you have periodontal disease. This disease is a chronic infection of the gums and bone surrounding your teeth.

It can erode the tissue, ligaments and bone that support your teeth. It can also cause a cycle of bleeding, pain, bad breath and tooth loss if left untreated.

A person can prevent and control bleeding gums by practicing good oral hygiene habits, eating healthy foods and seeing a doctor for regular checkups. They can also help their gums bleed less by reducing their stress level.

Brush your teeth twice a day with a soft-bristled toothbrush and floss regularly to remove plaque from your mouth. Avoid hard or sticky food items that can damage your braces or irritate your gums, such as corn on the cob, steak and popcorn.

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Loss of Bone and Ligaments

Your teeth are held in place by bone and ligaments that attach to the cementum (thin layer of tissue) covering the root, and to the alveolar bone that surrounds your jaw. Damage to these parts of your tooth can lead to a loose or missing tooth.

The pressure of biting and chewing stimulates your jawbone to grow new bone, but if you lose one or more teeth without replacing them, the stimulation is gone and your jawbone gradually deteriorates.

Certain conditions increase your chances of losing bone, including osteoporosis and Paget’s disease of bone (PDB). Tumors can also cause jawbone deterioration.

Periodontitis, a more severe form of gum disease, eats away at the bone and ligaments that hold your teeth in place. Eventually, this causes your jaw to deteriorate and your teeth may fall out or need to be extracted.

Tooth Decay

Tooth decay is caused by bacteria that feed on sugars and starches in food and drink, forming acids that attack the hard outer layer of teeth called enamel. These acids eat away at the tooth over time, damaging its layers, and eventually causing a hole (cavity) in the tooth.

Early stage tooth decay may not cause any symptoms at all, but your dentist will be able to spot it during an examination or x-ray. They can treat it by applying fluoride treatments like mouthwash or varnish, which will reverse the damage and strengthen your teeth.

As tooth decay progresses, it can lead to pain and infection in the center of your tooth (the pulp). This is where blood and nerves are found. If the decay gets to this part of the tooth, your dentist will need to remove it in a procedure known as root canal treatment. This will also sometimes result in the need to extract your tooth.

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